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Even when sex starts out fun and pleasurable, it doesn't always stay that way. Someone can start to feel uncomfortable during a sexual encounter for many reasons; they can feel unsafe, experience pain, or simply change their mind, explains psychologist Dr Lauren Moulds. Given many of us don't have the language to verbalise how we feel during sex, it's important we look for non-verbal cues from our sexual partner, she says.

Kerrin Bradfield, the chair of the Society of Australian Sexologists, says we all have a responsibility during sex to make sure people feel safe. Everyone should walk away thinking 'That was awesome'. We discuss with Dr Moulds and Ms Bradfield common reasons why consent and comfort can change during sex, and how to know that might be happening.

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It needs to be renegotiated constantly — especially when there is a shift in escalation of the interaction or nature of the sexual activity. There is back and forth, so by the time you order the pizza, you have something you both will like. She suggests making it a part of dirty talk.

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Enthusiastic consent means looking for the presence of a "hell yes! There is a difference between uncomfortable moments in sex we can laugh about, and those that are a warning something is wrong, says Dr Moulds. She says someone may feel uncomfortable during sex because they feel unsafe, in painself-conscious or even just awkward.

People who have experienced sexual trauma in the past may be more vulnerable to feeling unsafe in a sexual setting. Dr Moulds says just because someone agrees to a certain sexual activity, doesn't mean they can't change their mind. Looking for s your sexual partner is not feeling comfortable can help you identify "true consent", Dr Moulds says. While it can be different for everyone, she and Ms Bradfield list the following s as indications a person is uncomfortable:.

Dr Moulds says you can say something like "Hey, I noticed you were pulling back a bit — what was going on? Did it not feel good? Other things you can do include suggesting you take a break and remind them it's OK to stop and slow down. For example, "It seemed like you were more comfortable when we were just cuddling — can we go back to that?

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Print text only. Print Cancel. Consent needs to be ongoing Consent is not just something you need before sex begins, explains Ms Bradfield. The ongoing consent also needs to be enthusiastic, says Dr Moulds. Why consent and comfort can change during sex There is a difference between uncomfortable moments in sex we can laugh about, and those that are a warning something is wrong, says Dr Moulds. For example, touching a certain part of someone's body may trigger memories of an assault.

While it can be different for everyone, she and Ms Bradfield list the following s as indications a person is uncomfortable: They don't like talking about sex.

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For example, setting boundaries or expressing what they do and don't enjoy. They don't give enthusiastic consent. They aren't able to laugh when things get awkward. They seem tense being naked or when certain parts of their body are touched. They disengage. For example, don't give eye contact, are silent or seem not present. It can be a they are in the freeze response. But if a person is not moving, then stop having sex with them," Ms Bradfield says.

Their mood changes. That is worrying," Ms Bradfield says. If you spot any of the above, it is important you stop and check in. What to do if you're unsure If you are concerned about the other person, you need to speak up and ask how they are going.

address. Push through your fear and awkwardness and set boundaries for sex. The 'green flags' to look for before telling a new partner about sexual trauma. How to respond when a partner discloses sexual trauma. Learning to enjoy sex after you've been assaulted.

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Should you ever have sex when you don't really feel like it? My long-term partner is avoiding sex. What can I do? Why women are more likely to have bad sex than men. All bodies are different. But when it comes to sex some things are universal.

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